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Finding the forums for the new Adobe Presentations

Note: This blog post is from 2009. Some content may be outdated--though not necessarily. Same with links and subsequent comments from myself or others. Corrections are welcome, in the comments. And I may revise the content as necessary.
Just want to share this bit of info, in case others find it as hard to locate as I did.

If you start to use the new Adobe Presentations service, an online presentation-building tool, now at labs.adobe.com, you may want to engage in some discussion with other users, so may go looking for some forums. You may struggle as I did.

Sadly, there's none for it listed at the acrobat.com forums page. Perhaps that's because Presentations is still in lab status.

There's also none listed in the Help menu for Presentations. There is a link to share feedback, which gives you an email address. That's better than nothing, but it's not a discussion forum. Some may even fear using it if it might be a black hole.

I decided to go ahead use that feedback address. I was delighted to get a response pretty quickly (well, first an automated one, and then a real person).

But what surprised me most was that the automated email (offered in response to using that feedback address) offered the URL for the forum!

So where is the forum? It's at: http://forums.adobe.com/community/labs/presentations/.

I responded that this link really ought to be listed in the Help menu of Presentations, but that suggestion seems to be challenge for them to implement. Oh well. I decided to share the info here, and also as a comment in a blog entry on Presentations in the Acrobat.com blogs.

Just seems it shouldn't be so hard to find these forums.

ColdFusion Meetup now over 1,800 members!

Note: This blog post is from 2009. Some content may be outdated--though not necessarily. Same with links and subsequent comments from myself or others. Corrections are welcome, in the comments. And I may revise the content as necessary.
I just noticed that the ColdFusion Meetup now has over 1,800 members. Wow!

If you're not yet on the bandwagon :-), please consider it. Membership is entirely free. Just sign up at the site. It gets you email notification about the meetings, as well as the chance to share feedback on meetings they attend.

Of course, you don't need to join to attend the meetings. The RSS feeds for those are available free on the site, and the meetings are announced on twitter as well, via @cfmeetup. So we technically have even more members, unofficially.

But if you'd like to help us grow to the next 1,800 members, and more important, if you would like another avenue for learning more about CF and related technologies, please consider signing up. There's no obligation, and you're in total control of your membership experience.

About the CF Meetup

The CF Meetup is an official Adobe CF user group. Unlike most groups, we meet weekly (and sometimes twice!) on Thursdays at noon or 6pm US EDT (GMT -4, as of the date of this posting).

We have speakers from all over the world on all kinds of topics related to CF, whether new or classic topics, beginner or advanced; whether new or old presentations, or even new or experienced speakers. If you or anyone you know would like to present, there are always open slots sometime in the coming months.

We've now had 88 presentations since I took the reins from Steven Erat in April 2007. You can find links to all the titles, descriptions, and speaker bios, as well as recordings of the sessions, at recordings.coldfusionmeetup.com (or on my UGTV repository of nearly 400 recorded presentations from over 200 speakers).

CF911: Easier thread dumps and stack traces in CF: how and why

Note: This blog post is from 2009. Some content may be outdated--though not necessarily. Same with links and subsequent comments from myself or others. Corrections are welcome, in the comments. And I may revise the content as necessary.
You may have heard the value of taking thread dumps or stack traces when trying to understand and resolve problems with CF. They can be valuable to see what's really running on your server at the time it may seem hung or slow to respond. The problem is that they can be challenging to obtain, so here's how to get them even more easily.

(If you're not familiar with the value of thread dumps or stack traces, read on. The resources I point to get help you to appreciate their usefulness.)

[....Continue Reading....]

Several useful web dev topics, "Better Explained"

Note: This blog post is from 2009. Some content may be outdated--though not necessarily. Same with links and subsequent comments from myself or others. Corrections are welcome, in the comments. And I may revise the content as necessary.
I happened upon a site today with many quick, to the point, highly graphical articles introducing web app development topics that may interest some of my readers. Wanted to pass them along:

A few focus on Javascript and/or site building:

Still others aren't specific to web development, but can be valuable to all kinds of developers, and it was one of these that led me to the site in the first place:

The site is Better Explained, whose tag line is "Explanations for everyone". The author does a pretty good job of that. Some of the topics are a little too one-sided (the discussion of HTTP compression does only show setting it up in Apache, not IIS), and of course there's no mention of CF anywhere. :-) But we can't expect that from everyone. There are lots of positive comments and linkbacks on on many of the entries, so he'd done a good job in the eyes of most.

Indeed, if you may be hearing the siren call of Ruby on Rails, they have an article on that: Starting Ruby on Rails: What I Wish I Knew. There's also an intro to MVC, but again it's from a Rails perspective: Intermediate Rails: Understanding Models, Views and Controllers.

If there's something you'd like to see the author address on the site, he has a post for that, too: What do you want Better Explained?.

I'm speaking on the CFMeetup this week: Introducing the Adobe ColdFusion Extensions for Eclipse

Note: This blog post is from 2009. Some content may be outdated--though not necessarily. Same with links and subsequent comments from myself or others. Corrections are welcome, in the comments. And I may revise the content as necessary.
I'm one of the speakers this week on the Online ColdFusion Meetup. I'll be presenting in the noon (EDT) slot this Thursday, on "Introducing the Adobe ColdFusion Extensions for Eclipse". Before you yawn, are you sure you realize what I'm referring to?

This is not an introduction to Eclipse, and it's not about features in CFEclipse, so it may interest those who've long used CFEclipse but not the Adobe extensions. Yet it also doesn't presume prior experience with Eclipse or CFEclipse, so it's for pretty much everyone. And if you plan to be using Bolt, you'll want to attend since these extensions are included among the many features that Adobe has listed as coming Bolt.

Introducing the Adobe ColdFusion Extensions for Eclipse Whether you're already using Eclipse (via CFEclipse or not), or you've still not gotten into using it (or are waiting for Bolt), this talk if for you, if you don't know about the Adobe CF Extensions for Eclipse. Not to be confused with the CFEclipse plugin, the Adobe ColdFusion Extensions for Eclipse are a free set of very useful tools (for the free Eclipse editor) that many have missed, even if they do use CFEclipse. And if you don't yet use CFEclipse, these additional tools may offer features that might make you reconsider using Eclipse for CFML coding.

In this session, veteran CFer Charlie Arehart will introduce the extensions (not CFEclipse), including how to find and install the extensions from the Adobe site, as well how to use them to do many things: browse datasources and build queries, generate code using wizards, browse CFCs and web services, view log files, debug CF apps (discussed only briefly and supported only for CF8), and more.

Note that most of the features shown apply to if you're using CF7 as well. And since the upcoming new Adobe editor, codenamed Bolt, incorporates these same features (and many more, as discussed on the labs site), this talk will help you whatever your current or future plans.

Learn more about the event, including optional RSVP, a link to create calendar entries, and more, at the Meetup event page. You can also just show up on the day at the meetup Connect room.

There will be a 6pm (EDT) talk as well, by Sean Shroeder of Mura, introducing the Mura (formerly Sava) open source CMS. For more on these, and all CF Meetups, see my category of blog announcements about them.

Hope to see some of you Thursday at noon. I think most would learn something new. :-)

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